Sunday, September 24, 2017

Scorned For Rohingya Cleansing, But No Sanctions


HONG KONG — Despite international condemnation of Myanmar’s campaign of violence against the Rohingya people, there have been few calls for a return to the sort of sanctions that were long a part of the country’s relationship with the West.

After a Rohingya militant group attacked police outposts last month, Myanmar’s military, along with vigilante groups, launched a crackdown in the western state of Rakhine, triggering a refugee crisis that has sent more than 400,000 Rohingya (Bengali Muslims) fleeing to neighboring Bangladesh.

On Monday, Boris Johnson, Britain’s foreign secretary, led a private discussion of the Rohingya crisis among foreign ministers attending the United Nations General Assembly. Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, the de facto head of Myanmar’s government, last week decided not to attend the General Assembly, where she would probably have drawn a flood of criticism.

Saturday, September 23, 2017

Emmy Noether: The Mathematician You Never Heard Of


The Mighty Mathematician You’ve Never Heard Of: Scientists are a famously anonymous lot, but few can match in the depths of her perverse and unmerited obscurity the 20th-century mathematical genius Amalie Noether. Albert Einstein called her the most “significant” and “creative” female mathematician of all time, and others of her contemporaries were inclined to drop the modification by sex.

She invented a theorem that united with magisterial concision two conceptual pillars of physics: symmetry in nature and the universal laws of conservation. Some consider Noether’s theorem, as it is now called, as important as Einstein’s theory of relativity; it undergirds much of today’s vanguard research in physics, including the hunt for the almighty Higgs boson.

Yet Noether herself remains utterly unknown, not only to the general public, but to many members of the scientific community as well. When Dave Goldberg, a physicist at Drexel University who has written about her work, recently took a little “Noether poll” of several dozen colleagues, students and online followers, he was taken aback by the results. “Surprisingly few could say exactly who she was or why she was important,” he said. “A few others knew her name but couldn’t recall what she’d done, and the majority had never heard of her.”

Friday, September 22, 2017

Min Aung Hlaing Inspects The Army At Northern Arakan

(Edited Statements from The Burma Army C-in-C Office on 19& 20 September 2017.)

Nay Pyi Taw September 19:  Senior General Min Aung Hlaing arrives in Sittway the Yakhine State’s capital and inspects measures for regional peace and stability.

The were welcomed by Lt-Gen Aung Kyaw Zaw of the Office of the Commander-in-Chief (Army), the commander of Western Command, senior military officers, Secretary of Rakhine State government U Tin Maung Swe, Minister for Electricity, Industry and Transport U Aung Kyaw Zan and officials.

At the meeting hall of the Regional Operation Command (ROC-55) Headquarters in Sittway, the command commander in recounting the terrorist attacks in Buthidaung/ Maungtaw region in August, explained the beefing up of security operations in northern Rakhine State after the occurrence of violent attacks in October 2016.

Thursday, September 21, 2017

Britain Sent Burmese Army Officer Trainees Back Home

(Staff articles direct from The INDEPENDENT UK on 20 September 2017.)

Without publicly acknowledging the UK government has unilaterally terminated the training agreement with Burmese Army and sent all five trainee officers from Burmese army back to Burma. All five Burmese army officers currently receiving British training are now waiting at Burmese embassy in London for further instructions from the Army.

The Tatmadaw (Burmese Army) True News Information Committee has issued a statement today (20 September 2017) saying that it is making constant efforts to ensure amity and cooperation with armed forces of neighbouring countries, regional countries and international countries at a time when the country is exercising the multiparty democracy system.

In an attempt to promote relation and cooperation between armed forces of both countries, five officer trainees from Myanmar Tatmadaw are undergoing training in the UK. The UK sends them back to Myanmar as the UK’s Muslim parliamentarians (Most are Bangladesh-born) are calling for the suspension of training course with regard to the incidents in Rakhine State.

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Suicidal Rohingya ARSA Vs Genocidal Burma Army


BALUKHALI, Bangladesh — Nazir Hossain, the imam of a village in far western Myanmar, gathered the faithful around him after evening prayers last month. In a few hours, more than a dozen Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army (ARSA) fighters from his village would strike a nearby police post with an assortment of handmade weapons. The men needed their cleric’s blessing.

“As imam, I encouraged them never to step back from their mission,” Mr. Hossain recalled of his final words to the ethnic Rohingya militants. “I told them that if they did not fight to the death, the military would come and kill their families, their women and their children.”

They fought — joining an Aug. 25 assault by thousands of the group’s fighters against Myanmar’s security forces — and the retaliation came down anyway. Since then, Myanmar’s troops and vigilante mobs have unleashed a scorched-earth operation on Rohingya populations in northern Rakhine State in Myanmar, sending hundreds of thousands fleeing their homes in a campaign that the United Nations has called ethnic cleansing.

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Chinese Developers Behind Burma’s Bengali Cleansing?

(Two articles direct from The HRW & The HUFFPOST on 15 & 18 September 2017.)

HRW satelite image of a burning Bengali border village in Maungdaw District.
(Dhaka) – The Burmese military is deliberately burning ethnic Rohingya villages near the Bangladesh border, Human Rights Watch said today. Such acts of arson, after forcing residents to leave their villages, appear central to the Burmese military’s ethnic cleansing campaign against the Rohingya Muslim population in Burma’s Rakhine State.

Human Rights Watch released new satellite imagery and sensory data showing that 62 villages in northern Rakhine State were targeted by arson attacks between August 25 and September 14, 2017. Human Rights Watch identified 35 of these villages with extensive building destruction from very high resolution satellite imagery, and an additional 26 villages that had active fires detected in near-real time with environmental satellite sensors.

“Our field research backs what the satellite imagery has indicated – that the Burmese military is directly responsible for the mass burning of Rohingya villages in northern Rakhine State,” said Phil Robertson, deputy Asia director. “The United Nations and member countries should urgently impose measures on the Burmese government to stop these atrocities and end the forced flight of Rohingya from Burma.”

Monday, September 18, 2017

Bangladesh Detains 2 Burmese Photo-Journalists


Detained Burmese journalists Min Zeya Oo (L) and Khun Lat (R).
The International Federation of Journalists (IFJ) is deeply concerned over the detainment in Bangladesh of two Myanmar photojournalists on charges “impersonation” and providing “false information” and calls on the Bangladeshi authorities for their immediate release and dropping of all charges.

The IFJ joins Myanmar Journalists’ Association (MJA) in also calling for the full engagement of Myanmar’s Ministry of Information and Ministry of Foreign Affairs in negotiating their earliest release.

Award-winning photojournalist Min Zayar Oo and his assistant, Hkun Lat, who work for German magazine GEO, were accused of entering Bangladesh on tourist visas instead of journalist visas, and reporting “fake news” and arrested on September 7.

They have been denied bail and are in detention. The photojournalists face up to seven years in jail if found guilty of violating Bangladesh’s immigration laws. GEO had said its editorial board was deeply concerned about the two journalists' continued detention.

Saturday, September 16, 2017

Biased International Media & UN Lying About Rohingyas


Buddhist children killed by ARSA on Aug-26.
(No foreign media publishes Buddist suffering)
YANGON — Headlines with prominent references to “genocide” and “ethnic cleansing’ in Myanmar make veteran journalist Daw Aye Aye Win uneasy, as she explains she feels international media coverage about what is happening in northern Rakhine State fails to tell the whole story of the crisis.

Currently, the region is reeling from Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army (ARSA) attacks on 30 police outposts on Aug. 25 and subsequent violence affecting civilians. The Myanmar government declared the Muslim militant group a terrorist organization and has since begun “clearance operations” in the area, leading to Buddhist Rakhine, self-identifying Rohingya Muslims and other Rakhine sub-ethnicities to flee their homes.

Some of the nearly 400,000 Muslims fleeing to Bangladesh have accused the army and ethnic Arakanese of killings, rape and torching of their homes, while members of the 30,000 Arakanese and other ethnic groups internally displaced have claimed they sought refuge elsewhere for fear of attacks from Muslims, who are the majority in the area, but a minority in the country.

Burmese Army Sending The Buddhists Back To Homes

(Translated staff article direct from The ARMY CinC OFFICE on 15 September 2017.)

Since the week-long massive clearing operations by Army’s LID-99 and LID-33 had pushed ARSA Bengali Muslim insurgents and their supporters into Bangladesh the whole border area on Burma’s side has returned to peace and tranquillity.

Without dreaded Bengali Muslims always threatening the native Buddhist villages dotted among massive illegal villages of Bengali Muslims from Bangladesh the native Buddhist Yakhine and Burmese refugees are slowly returning to their villages, farms, and fishing grounds now well under the armed-protection of Burmese Army.

Just yesterday a battalion-strong army column from Na-Pa-Kha (Western Military Divisional Command) had escorted altogether 554 native Buddhist villagers taking a temporary refuge in the Taung-Byo-Let-Wel village’s army camp in Muangdaw-North back to their home village.